There are many different types of heart disease so you can’t just break it down into one statement: “Ok, I have heart disease. What’s the cure?” It doesn’t work that way. Heart disease is much deeper than one set of symptoms and one diagnosis. Before you can cure your heart disease, you have to figure out what type of heart disease you have (by matching your symptoms as closely as possible) and then going from there. This guide will address several types of heart disease, the symptoms for each, and what you should do to best control it. Let us begin.

Coronary Heart Disease
Coronary Heart Disease, also known as CHD, is the most common of all the heart-related problems. It’s caused by your arteries getting smaller which leads to your heart not getting enough blood supply.


Heart Attack

A heart attack is also extremely common throughout places like the United States where people engorge upon beefy cheeseburgers, salt-soaked fries, and double decker milkshakes. These types of food aren’t good for you at all and most people who eat these types of food on a regular basis also don’t get much exercise. Another victim of heart attacks is the elderly. As you get older, your body gets weaker and it’s as if your heart has to work double time just to keep up with you anymore. People with heart problems in general should take it easy, lay off the salty/high cholesterol foods, and visit a doctor regularly for checkups. If you’re ever in the unlucky position to be experiencing a heart attack first-hand, sit down immediately and try not to move or stress your body. Take an ibuprofen to reduce inflammation and call 911 within 1-2 minutes of first feeling a heart attack. Heart attacks are generally felt as a shooting pain in your left arm just beforehand, followed by an immense pain in your chest. Trust me, if you’re having a heart attack, you’ll know it.


High blood pressure

High blood pressure, also known as hyptertension, is a common thing that effects about 50 millions Americans and countless others worldwide. Once again, it’s generally caused by fatty foods. High blood pressure is often hard to diagnose as it has so few symptoms that you don’t even know that you have it. The best thing to do to avoid high blood pressure is to simply get checked out every six months or so or even just go down to your local Publix and use their blood pressure machine. If you already know that you have high blood pressure, the best thing to do is try to avoid stressful situations as often as possible. Light or mediate exercise is fine, just don’t overdo it. A few ways to know if you may have high blood pressure is if you often wake up with a headache or if headache continues throughout the day, you have a ringing or buzzing noise in your ears, and/or you’re often dizzy or confused. Go to your doctor and they can give you some medication for it but other than that, they’re just gonna tell you the same thing.

Ischemic heart disease
Ischemic heart disease is the opposite of hyptertension, in that it is the reduced flow of blood to the heart. The main symptom involved with ischemic heart disease is the concurrent feeling of chest pain, especially pain in the left side of the chest (around the heart). The best thing to do for ischemic heart disease, aside from visiting a doctor, is to start up an exercise routine in order to raise your pulse, thereby making the heart pump faster. If you’re not eating regularly or moving around that much then you may be a candidate for ischemic heart disease. Not only would exerising and developing a routine diet help with your heart troubles but it can also help you lose weight, which is also a common attribute to those with heart disease. Remember, you’re health is on the line here, so do whatever it takes to get back on top. You control your body, not the other way around.

Heart rhythm disorders
Heart rhymth disorders, also known as heart murmurs, are irregularities in the sound that the heart makes when listened to by a doctor via the means of a stethescope. Sometimes heart murmurs are harmless and are just weird sounds that the heart makes. Other times, however, heart murmurs can be extremely serious and need to be checked out more thoroughly for a deeper analysis. The only way to really know if you have a heart murmur is by going to a doctor so make sure you get a checkup every 3-6 months just to make sure you’re kept in tip-top shape. If you do learn that you have a heart murmur, the doctor will address the situation and give you instructions on how to take care of the problem.

Tachycardia
Tachycardia is a very serious matter in which the heart is racing at an extremely high pace. You may be able to diagnose tachycardia yourself if you have shortness of breath, find yourself dizzy for no reason, or you just get that feeling where you can sense your own heartbeat without even checking your pulse and you know it’s extra high. Often times you would experience several of these symptoms at once. If you just got done exercising, running, or do some other strenuous activity (yes, getting mad is included), then don’t worry about it as it’s probably not tachycardia. If, however, your heart keeps racing for more than ten to twenty minutes after you stopped doing these things or just have a rapid pulse for no reason, then you might want to call a doctor as soon as possible. While you’re waiting on the doctor, you need to sit down and relax immediately and calm down. In this case, laughter can really be the best medicine as it takes your mind off of it. So sit on the couch, watch some standup comedy and do your best to get your mind off of your racing heart. Slow, steady breathing can also help so either grab a paper bag or just slow your breathing on your own accord. This is very important and it could possibly mean life or death.

Rheumatic heart disease

Rheumatic heart disease is a problem associated with heart damage from rheumatic flu. It can be diagnosed by a fever and/or rash along with chest pains or heartburn. This is usually due to a problem with the valves in your heart not being able to close properly which leads to blood spilling out into the wrong parts of the heart. In extreme cases, rheumatic heart disease can lead to heart failure so if you even suspect it (if you notice these symptoms after experiencing rheumatic fever) then go to the doctor’s office or hospital as soon as possible.

Pulmonary heart disease

Pulmonary heart disease is caused by an abnormal pressure on the lungs due to an improper flow of blood to that region. A diagnosis can be reached if you notice you frequently have shortness of breath, chest pain or faint on occasion. If you have been diagnosed with pulmonary hypertension, cystic fibrosis or advanced emphysema and are now experiencing these symptoms, you may have pulmonary heart disease. There’s nothing you can really do personally to correct pulmonary heart disease as its an actual hardware problem with your body. Go to a doctor and get it checked out and they may be able to fix you up.

Whatever you have, or think you have, the best thing you can do is go to the doctor and get checked out. Nothing in this guide should replace information from a educated professional who has studied the field more thoroughly.

For more information on heart disease and heart disease prevention please visit:

Pulmonary Infection
Reasons to Improve Blood Lipid Levels
What is Angina?
Cardiac Diet